Health An Overview of Qi Gong Practices

StrayDog

Cro-Magnon Man
Cro-Magnon Man
Joined
Feb 23, 2022
Messages
376
This is in response to forum members' inquiry into the role of taichi in the practices of sexual cultivation as outlined in this thread here https://www.skilledseducer.com/threads/how-to-draw-orgasms-up-your-spine.26872/

I figured I would just give a very general overview of these practices, and how they relate to each other. You will also find some basic mindsets, and concepts, I feel will be helpful for approaching these practices. As well as some tips on how to find a teacher, and some additional reading material for those of you compelled to dig deeper.


Qi Gong Practices

Qi Gong (or Chi Kung. Different Chinese dialects) is a whole system of practices. The words roughly translate to Energy Work. Qi, the energy that runs through all existence. Gong, a skill acquired through hard work and discipline. Gong Fu (Kung Fu) is any skill that is acquired through hard work and discipline. So basket weaving, or math, can be Kung Fu as much as knowing how to defend one's body in self defense. Or, healing the body and mind, bringing them back to their most harmonious natural state. Kung Fu
enter-the-dragon-japanese-style_u-L-F4S80Y0.jpg


As you are reading through these, keep in mind though each practice is it's own form, they all share similar principles, as Qi Gong as a whole is one system of thought. Here are a few of the branches of this rich system

Medical Qi Gong: Acupuncture, Herbs, Diet. Personally, I have had better results with other systems of diet, but that's just me. Also have had pretty compelling experiences with herbs and acupuncture, but that's just me. Obviously very different from a western understanding of medicine. Pros and cons to everything. Diet is crucial for a well-rounded holistic practice.

Mediation/Spiritual Development: This includes the sexual cultivation practices I outlined above, but also includes many forms of mental and spiritual development mediations. Different ways of training your mind, awareness, and attention. Sexual cultivation practices, like the ones I outlined on the forum link above, will often be found in this branch of qi gong. Taoist and Buddhist monks use these practices to achieve different states of mind conducive to their spiritual aims. These states of mind can range from dream-like states to deeply focused or restful states. Spiritual enlightenment is often cited as the ultimate pursuit of these practices, but I wouldn't say that one must subscribe to that school of thought in order to find a great deal of value in these practices.

Medical movement practices (this is what is commonly referred to when people in the west say they are practicing Qi Gong) These are body conditioning exercises. There are a lot of forms of this practice. I personally like the 'silk-reeling' forms which are designed to change the physiological condition of your muscular tissues, and your connective tissues, as well as reintegrate your central nervous system, and stimulate your organ functions. I also enjoy marrow-washing exercises, in which you meditate all the way down into your bone marrow (yes, we have nerve endings all the way into our bone marrow) and circulate your attention all the way through your body. This is one of the most profoundly relaxing and rejuvenating exercises I have discovered. These medical qi gong practices are designed to unwind pathological patterns of movements and thinking. Aligning the body and mind to their most harmonious, and vital state of being.

Tai Chi (Tai Ji in some dialects), Baguazhang, Xing Yi Quan (spelled Hsing-I in some dialects): These are the three 'internal' martial arts of china. They are martial forms that utilize the same principles found in the medical movements of qi gong. However, the forms are designed to channel more force through the body, as well as be applied in combat situations.

Tai chi (taichi roughly translates to the 'state of duality', this is yin and eternally at play with one another), the most commonly known 'internal' martial art. It consists of long-flowing movements. It is both linear and circular in form.

Baghuazhang (8 trigrams palm, based on the 8 trigrams of the i-ching. My personal fave to practice) consists of many circular twisting movements. The forms are practiced while walking in a circle, the body torquing in multiple directions at once. Walking the circle is extremely fun and trance-inducing. It is said Baguazhang was created to fight 8 people at once (yeah right)

Xing Yi Quan ( roughly translate to Form Will Fists) is often called the 'brave or foolish way' for its linear, forward-charging, explosive movements. Developed for the Chinese military way back in the day, It is used to just barrel through your enemy at all costs. It is said that Xing Yi Quan is very helpful in developing a mind that focuses on a goal and achieves it, but it is also known for being ruthless. The whole Ying Yi Quan system is based on the 'five elements theory.' Metal, water, wood, fire, and earth. There is a 'fist' (read; form) for each elements. This internal martial art is the most simple in terms of the number of movements used in it's system

It is often disputed how effective these 'martial arts' are in real-world combat, and I can totally understand why. Over the centuries the more martial applications have been lost to flowery dance-like forms, losing a lot of 'root' to the practice. The 'martial' applications being more about show than anything. The people's revolution in china played a huge roll in this, when nearly 70% of traditional Taoist documents were burned. Many martial art and medical forms were band, and those caught practicing them where often killed or sent to labor camps. The practice basically became synonymous with old people. I have only met a small number of people that I felt could convincingly use these forms in a fight. And even then it was just one small tool in their bigger tool kit. That said, I do believe there are viable self defense applications to these arts. Just rare to see it done well. The movements themselves are very counter-intuitive, and the amount of practice/dicipline it takes to develop the physiological conditions to perform them well is rather staggering. Traditionally, in some schools, you would stand in one posture for a whole year before you started to learn other movements.

A Quality of Body Condition
Note the quality of movements this man performs at the 2:13 time mark (the entire video is informative for any one new to the practice)

Did you see how he is sort of 'sinking' into the earth, almost as if he is magnetized to it, his whole tendon body wrapping, twisting, turning in unison? The whole body a continuum, each piece relating to the next. Almost like one bid rubbery suit working in unison. Did you notice this quality of sinking downward but also pulling force upward from the earth through his entire structure? The force moving through one clear pathway, like the force through a whip, or an electrical current through a series of wires. It may be tricky to notice these qualities at first, but go compare it with other clips of taichi and see if you can notice the difference. More so than it can be seen, this quality can be felt. Especially when you push hands with someone who has it. It is literally as though you are pushing against the earth through their body and when they move, the force of the earth moves back up through their body to meet you. They do all this while remaining incredibly relaxed, they are not using tension or muscular force, but the body's natural structure and mechanics as an entire unit.


Finding a good teacher
This is what you want to look for in a teacher. This distinctive body condition, along with a palpable way of divulging otherwise esoteric information. While sometimes helpful, an over-reliance (which you see very often) on esoteric concepts, or visualization exercises, can lead to a rootless form. Flowery but lacking the physiological condition necessary for the full benefits of the practice. Visualization is just a map. Relying on it is like asking someone about the soil quality in Montana and they pull out a map of Montana and point to the soil. While visualization might be helpful to lead you there, it is crucial it matches up with a felt physiological sense. Better yet visualizations should rise from the felt physiological sense. Let the terrain inform the map.

When looking for a teacher inquire into their approach by asking about this physiological condition. Ask for a demonstration of it. Ask how they have come to develop it. Ask to push hands to see if you can feel it. Also, you may find a teacher who has a strong development in regards to this body condition, but you don't resonate with their philosophy and approach. You may even find guys who have questionable standards of ethics. I have met some pretty scary dudes (sure loved their violent altercations) who 'had it' in some regards but not others. You will have to ask yourself how much you are willing to stick around in order to get good knowledge. Some teachers may be more adapt at the more medative/spiritual forms of this practice, some at the more physical/martial forms. At first, you may have to piece together knowledge from a few sources (without watering down the practice), until you find a teacher who you gel with on many levels.

Also, watch out for teachers whose idea of 'soft' or 'relaxed' leaves their form floppy like a wet noodle. This is bad practice, and very common. What you are looking for is a 'fullness' as if the body is inflated like a balloon. Full, But not tense. When you push your finger into a balloon the rubbery outside yields, but the inside remains full, and the entire structure of the balloon remains intact and connected (unless you pop it of course). In these practices, 'softness' and relaxation are possible because that relaxation is supported by the body's form and structure underneath. As well as the support from the earth below our feet. Relaxed, but energized and alert. I know this may sound esoteric but I guarantee you will know it when you see it, and even more so when you feel it.

And remember, your body is the ultimate teacher. He is the one who holds the wisdom and knowledge you seek, as long as you learn to listen.


Metaphor Meets Body
This is how a see a lot of the traditional teachings of these practices, they are clever metaphors that help describe the felt experience of physics and physiology. This may be why the west has a hard time accepting these practices. The sort of subjective nature of these sensory experiences, the language around them, and also some outdated superstitious esotericism thrown into some linages of teaching. Once you understand the language in traditional teachings to be more of metaphor for felt experience it can start to make sense. Drawing 'energy' up your spine is less ephemeral when you understand it to be a method of scanning your awaness through your physiological state and inducing specific physiological responses that are conducive to holistic forms of healing. The feeling of energy being the felt sense of your blood, the cells in your tissues, the cerebral spinal fluids, the lymphatic fluids, your central nervous system, the functions of your organs, and so on. The systems of metaphor surrounding these practices are simply common language practitioners developed to discuss these felt senses. In your practice, some of these metaphors may make more sense to you than others. I have been continually surprised at just how much sense they make in terms of a felt experience. With this said, it also makes sense why these practices are so often misunderstood. How many people have developed the ability to feel all the way into their bone marrow, then come up with a clear way of describing that feeling, in a manner that helps others achieve a similar awareness?

Standing Like a Tree (Post stand, or tree post standing, as it is commonly referred to)

This is an absolutely foundational practice that will deepen all other forms of practice 100-fold. It is a practice often left out of many schools, yet so crucial for a true understanding of these practices.

Basically, you stand in a series of postures for extended periods of time. During these long periods of standing, the pathological holding patterns you have in your body begin to burn out. By following a series of guiding principles, you create conditions in your body that are conducive to the unwinding of these holding patterns, as well as the realigning of your entire physiological system in relation to gravity. This aids in the cultivation of a body condition where the top of your head is seamlessly in relation with the earth, and vice versa the surface of the earth is pressing back up towards the top of your head. This creates a clear channel in your structural anatomy that allows the body to find its most balanced and integrated sense of being.

This is a practice of personal discovery. You begin to notice every minute detail of how you hold yourself, how you relate to yourself, and how you relate to physical reality (such as your connection to the earth's gravitational pull). In this, you may even discover how your social relations manifest themselves in your body perception, and pathological holding patterns. For example, one discovery I made was how much of the minor or major anxieties I might experience in daily life were actually tied to how I (in my body) felt so disconnected from the earth. A subtle state of constant falling and catching myself. Wobbling. Fighting to hold myself up. My head was literally disconnected from a sense of connection and place in the world. Anxiety. But, just like you will discover the nuances of your current pathological state, you will also discover your body's miraculous ability to find its way 'home'. Moving closer and closer to the natural harmonized state that the body was designed to occupy. The sense of peace that has come with the learning of this ability to balance peacefully and somewhat (I still have a ways to go) effortless in gravity, with the support of the earth's gravitational pull, has had incredible implications on my life.

As you deepen your ability to align the body in its most naturally balanced and aligned state, in relation to the earth's gravity, the more you will be able to bring this depth of bodily condition to your movement-based practices, and in turn your everyday life.

A Different Conception of Strength

Qi Gongs' conception of strength can feel very different from that of more western conceptions like bodybuilding. Instead of strength being seen as the accumulation of muscle mass down, Qi Gongs' sense of strength is built on this notion of an entire system working in unison down to its most foundational level. There is a difference between fitness and health. While someone may be able to lift 600lbs, that does not tell you about the internal condition of their joints, their organs, and so on. While more external forms of exercise ( think calisthenics, weight lifting, or more 'hard' forms of martial arts ) are important forms of bodily development, those are seen as outer expressions of an internal structure. Much like adding fibers to the wires of an electrical system, it helps in the transference of electrical currents, but it is just part of a bigger electrical system which includes transformers and generators and the like. If the generator is down, the wires don't mean jack.

In Qi Gong practices instead of working out, you are 'working in.'

A Well Rounded Practice

Hopefully, this document has given you a good jumping-off point as you explore your interests in these powerful healing practices. Like any set of practices, it is important to have a dynamic and well-rounded routine. At first, this can often mean a period of experimentation. Eventually finding forms of practice that make the most sense to your character and approach. This said, as you are getting into this whole world of Qi Gong, I believe it is important to approach it from multiple angles, as each form of practice informs the next in new and dynamic ways.

As you develop your meditative practices (both standing and sitting), your movement-based practice will begin to take on new dimensions. Vice versa as you expand your sense of movement in the world, your sitting practice will open up to you in profoundly new ways. Let us not forget our diet either, as this is fundamental to our cellular condition, and thus our lived experience. Having a proper diet will increase your depth of practice tenfold. It will be the fuel of which every other facet is driven by.

So a well-rounded Qi Gong practice might include

-Diet
-Sitting meditation
-Medical Qi Gong forms
-Martial Qi Gong forms
-More external practices like calisthenics and lifting, or 'hard/external' martial arts like karate jujitsu taekwondo, or any of the many martial forms across the world


Additional Resources

Here is a list of authors and some of their books that have helped me in my developing practice. The books I will list are ones that I think serve well as an entry point into the practice, as opposed to more advanced texts.

Dr. Yang Jwing Ming
This is the gentleman in the video I posted above. He has done a great deal to preserve these arts. With his lifelong practice of chinese martial Arts, and his PHD in mechanical engineering, he does a wonderful. job of bridging the traditional Chinese worldview with a western audience. His books are dense and scholarly, but also simple to read. They are extremely well structured textbooks. His books are great for beginners and well-traveled alike, some of which get incredibly deep . Ranging from slim and accessible overviews of the practices to dense 600 page tomes about one single breathing technique, and the like. You can find all of his educational materials and more at his website for YMAA (Yang Martial Arts Association)

Qigong for Health and Martial Arts- This is a great slim volume that is accessible but with enough depth to build foundational knowledge you can draw upon. It serves as a great overview of the Qi Gong system, as well as providing exercises as a good jumping-off point

The Essence of Taiji Qigong- This book is an absolute gem for any one interested in learn Tai Chi. It is slim and accessible, while at the same time being dense and rich with knowledge. It is the perfect foundational place to begin a solid Tai Chi practice

Bruce Frantzis
This guy was instrumental in bringing a lot of these practices to America back in the 70's and 80's. He lived in China a good deal of time studying with masters who held the traditions of different lineages of practice. He was one of the primary connections of these masters to the states, teaching their knowledge in America, as well as flying them overseas to teach. His teaching is clear, concise, and easy to put into practice.

The Power of Internal Martial are: Combat Secrets of Ba Gua, Taichi, and Hsing-i - This book is one part personal memoir, one part theoretical overview, and one part practical manual. It covers Bruces own journey in discovering the internal arts, his travels to china, and the masters he met. It is often inspiring. You learn about the cultural significance of these art forms through the stories of the masters he was training with. It will also give you a solid overview of the principles of Tai Chi, Bagua, and Xing Yi so that you can understand the similarities and differences in these forms. As well as provide solid foundation to begin a practice. It does not provide lengthy descriptions of each movement in a given form though, so that will have to be found in other reading material

Opening the Energy Gates of Your Body- This is a solid and accessible overview of the basic principles used in Qi Gong movement exercises

You can also find Bruce Frantsiz on his youtube channel and website Energy Arts. Here are two solid videos that can offer a great deal of insight and clarity into these practices.
You may notice he moves a bit oddly in his hips. This is due to a number of car accidents he had where the doctors were going to fuse his spine together. They told him he would never walk again. He opted instead to heal himself with these practices. Watching these videos you almost wouldn't believe that this is a man who was 'never going to walk again'


Mantak Chia

Mantak Chias teachings can veer more into the realms of esoterica for my personal taste but he is a well-known and respected figure in the community for a reason. There is a great deal of depth to his teachings. For the more secular reader, if you can get past some of the more 'wu wu' elements you will find rich new insights that can be applied practically to the practice

Taoist Teachings of love: Cultivating Male Sexual Energy- Buy a copy for yourself
Taoist Secrets of Love: Cultivation Female Sexual Energy- Have enough copies for the closest connection in your rotation

The Inner Structure of Tai Chi- The name says it all. This book does a fantastic job at outlining the more nuanced sensations of the inner-felt experience of the taichi practice. With in-depth descriptions of all of the expanding, contracting, twisting, turning, sinking, rising (and so on) that goes on in your body during each form.
 
Last edited:

Wick

Cro-Magnon Man
Cro-Magnon Man
Joined
Dec 25, 2012
Messages
906
Thanks for writing this up man. I’m still going through the other post and then I’ll check this one out too.
 

miker

Space Monkey
space monkey
Joined
Jan 27, 2022
Messages
59
This is in response to forum members' inquiry into the role of taichi in the practices of sexual cultivation as outlined in this thread here https://www.skilledseducer.com/threads/how-to-draw-orgasms-up-your-spine.26872/

I figured I would just give a very general overview of these practices, and how they relate to each other. You will also find some basic mindsets, and concepts, I feel will be helpful for approaching these practices. As well as some tips on how to find a teacher, and some additional reading material for those of you compelled to dig deeper.


Qi Gong Practices

Qi Gong (or Chi Kung. Different Chinese dialects) is a whole system of practices. The words roughly translate to Energy Work. Qi, the energy that runs through all existence. Gong, a skill acquired through hard work and discipline. Gong Fu (Kung Fu) is any skill that is acquired through hard work and discipline. So basket weaving, or math, can be Kung Fu as much as knowing how to defend one's body in self defense. Or, healing the body and mind, bringing them back to their most harmonious natural state. Kung Fu
enter-the-dragon-japanese-style_u-L-F4S80Y0.jpg


As you are reading through these, keep in mind though each practice is it's own form, they all share similar principles, as Qi Gong as a whole is one system of thought. Here are a few of the branches of this rich system

Medical Qi Gong: Acupuncture, Herbs, Diet. Personally, I have had better results with other systems of diet, but that's just me. Also have had pretty compelling experiences with herbs and acupuncture, but that's just me. Obviously very different from a western understanding of medicine. Pros and cons to everything. Diet is crucial for a well-rounded holistic practice.

Mediation/Spiritual Development: This includes the sexual cultivation practices I outlined above, but also includes many forms of mental and spiritual development mediations. Different ways of training your mind, awareness, and attention. Sexual cultivation practices, like the ones I outlined on the forum link above, will often be found in this branch of qi gong. Taoist and Buddhist monks use these practices to achieve different states of mind conducive to their spiritual aims. These states of mind can range from dream-like states to deeply focused or restful states. Spiritual enlightenment is often cited as the ultimate pursuit of these practices, but I wouldn't say that one must subscribe to that school of thought in order to find a great deal of value in these practices.

Medical movement practices (this is what is commonly referred to when people in the west say they are practicing Qi Gong) These are body conditioning exercises. There are a lot of forms of this practice. I personally like the 'silk-reeling' forms which are designed to change the physiological condition of your muscular tissues, and your connective tissues, as well as reintegrate your central nervous system, and stimulate your organ functions. I also enjoy marrow-washing exercises, in which you meditate all the way down into your bone marrow (yes, we have nerve endings all the way into our bone marrow) and circulate your attention all the way through your body. This is one of the most profoundly relaxing and rejuvenating exercises I have discovered. These medical qi gong practices are designed to unwind pathological patterns of movements and thinking. Aligning the body and mind to their most harmonious, and vital state of being.

Tai Chi (Tai Ji in some dialects), Baguazhang, Xing Yi Quan (spelled Hsing-I in some dialects): These are the three 'internal' martial arts of china. They are martial forms that utilize the same principles found in the medical movements of qi gong. However, the forms are designed to channel more force through the body, as well as be applied in combat situations.

Tai chi (taichi roughly translates to the 'state of duality', this is yin and eternally at play with one another), the most commonly known 'internal' martial art. It consists of long-flowing movements. It is both linear and circular in form.

Baghuazhang (8 trigrams palm, based on the 8 trigrams of the i-ching. My personal fave to practice) consists of many circular twisting movements. The forms are practiced while walking in a circle, the body torquing in multiple directions at once. Walking the circle is extremely fun and trance-inducing. It is said Baguazhang was created to fight 8 people at once (yeah right)

Xing Yi Quan ( roughly translate to Form Will Fists) is often called the 'brave or foolish way' for its linear, forward-charging, explosive movements. Developed for the Chinese military way back in the day, It is used to just barrel through your enemy at all costs. It is said that Xing Yi Quan is very helpful in developing a mind that focuses on a goal and achieves it, but it is also known for being ruthless. The whole Ying Yi Quan system is based on the 'five elements theory.' Metal, water, wood, fire, and earth. There is a 'fist' (read; form) for each elements. This internal martial art is the most simple in terms of the number of movements used in it's system

It is often disputed how effective these 'martial arts' are in real-world combat, and I can totally understand why. Over the centuries the more martial applications have been lost to flowery dance-like forms, losing a lot of 'root' to the practice. The 'martial' applications being more about show than anything. The people's revolution in china played a huge roll in this, when nearly 70% of traditional Taoist documents were burned. Many martial art and medical forms were band, and those caught practicing them where often killed or sent to labor camps. The practice basically became synonymous with old people. I have only met a small number of people that I felt could convincingly use these forms in a fight. And even then it was just one small tool in their bigger tool kit. That said, I do believe there are viable self defense applications to these arts. Just rare to see it done well. The movements themselves are very counter-intuitive, and the amount of practice/dicipline it takes to develop the physiological conditions to perform them well is rather staggering. Traditionally, in some schools, you would stand in one posture for a whole year before you started to learn other movements.

A Quality of Body Condition
Note the quality of movements this man performs at the 2:13 time mark (the entire video is informative for any one new to the practice)

Did you see how he is sort of 'sinking' into the earth, almost as if he is magnetized to it, his whole tendon body wrapping, twisting, turning in unison? The whole body a continuum, each piece relating to the next. Almost like one bid rubbery suit working in unison. Did you notice this quality of sinking downward but also pulling force upward from the earth through his entire structure? The force moving through one clear pathway, like the force through a whip, or an electrical current through a series of wires. It may be tricky to notice these qualities at first, but go compare it with other clips of taichi and see if you can notice the difference. More so than it can be seen, this quality can be felt. Especially when you push hands with someone who has it. It is literally as though you are pushing against the earth through their body and when they move, the force of the earth moves back up through their body to meet you. They do all this while remaining incredibly relaxed, they are not using tension or muscular force, but the body's natural structure and mechanics as an entire unit.


Finding a good teacher
This is what you want to look for in a teacher. This distinctive body condition, along with a palpable way of divulging otherwise esoteric information. While sometimes helpful, an over-reliance (which you see very often) on esoteric concepts, or visualization exercises, can lead to a rootless form. Flowery but lacking the physiological condition necessary for the full benefits of the practice. Visualization is just a map. Relying on it is like asking someone about the soil quality in Montana and they pull out a map of Montana and point to the soil. While visualization might be helpful to lead you there, it is crucial it matches up with a felt physiological sense. Better yet visualizations should rise from the felt physiological sense. Let the terrain inform the map.

When looking for a teacher inquire into their approach by asking about this physiological condition. Ask for a demonstration of it. Ask how they have come to develop it. Ask to push hands to see if you can feel it. Also, you may find a teacher who has a strong development in regards to this body condition, but you don't resonate with their philosophy and approach. You may even find guys who have questionable standards of ethics. I have met some pretty scary dudes (sure loved their violent altercations) who 'had it' in some regards but not others. You will have to ask yourself how much you are willing to stick around in order to get good knowledge. Some teachers may be more adapt at the more medative/spiritual forms of this practice, some at the more physical/martial forms. At first, you may have to piece together knowledge from a few sources (without watering down the practice), until you find a teacher who you gel with on many levels.

Also, watch out for teachers whose idea of 'soft' or 'relaxed' leaves their form floppy like a wet noodle. This is bad practice, and very common. What you are looking for is a 'fullness' as if the body is inflated like a balloon. Full, But not tense. When you push your finger into a balloon the rubbery outside yields, but the inside remains full, and the entire structure of the balloon remains intact and connected (unless you pop it of course). In these practices, 'softness' and relaxation are possible because that relaxation is supported by the body's form and structure underneath. As well as the support from the earth below our feet. Relaxed, but energized and alert. I know this may sound esoteric but I guarantee you will know it when you see it, and even more so when you feel it.

And remember, your body is the ultimate teacher. He is the one who holds the wisdom and knowledge you seek, as long as you learn to listen.


Metaphor Meets Body
This is how a see a lot of the traditional teachings of these practices, they are clever metaphors that help describe the felt experience of physics and physiology. This may be why the west has a hard time accepting these practices. The sort of subjective nature of these sensory experiences, the language around them, and also some outdated superstitious esotericism thrown into some linages of teaching. Once you understand the language in traditional teachings to be more of metaphor for felt experience it can start to make sense. Drawing 'energy' up your spine is less ephemeral when you understand it to be a method of scanning your awaness through your physiological state and inducing specific physiological responses that are conducive to holistic forms of healing. The feeling of energy being the felt sense of your blood, the cells in your tissues, the cerebral spinal fluids, the lymphatic fluids, your central nervous system, the functions of your organs, and so on. The systems of metaphor surrounding these practices are simply common language practitioners developed to discuss these felt senses. In your practice, some of these metaphors may make more sense to you than others. I have been continually surprised at just how much sense they make in terms of a felt experience. With this said, it also makes sense why these practices are so often misunderstood. How many people have developed the ability to feel all the way into their bone marrow, then come up with a clear way of describing that feeling, in a manner that helps others achieve a similar awareness?

Standing Like a Tree (Post stand, or tree post standing, as it is commonly referred to)

This is an absolutely foundational practice that will deepen all other forms of practice 100-fold. It is a practice often left out of many schools, yet so crucial for a true understanding of these practices.

Basically, you stand in a series of postures for extended periods of time. During these long periods of standing, the pathological holding patterns you have in your body begin to burn out. By following a series of guiding principles, you create conditions in your body that are conducive to the unwinding of these holding patterns, as well as the realigning of your entire physiological system in relation to gravity. This aids in the cultivation of a body condition where the top of your head is seamlessly in relation with the earth, and vice versa the surface of the earth is pressing back up towards the top of your head. This creates a clear channel in your structural anatomy that allows the body to find its most balanced and integrated sense of being.

This is a practice of personal discovery. You begin to notice every minute detail of how you hold yourself, how you relate to yourself, and how you relate to physical reality (such as your connection to the earth's gravitational pull). In this, you may even discover how your social relations manifest themselves in your body perception, and pathological holding patterns. For example, one discovery I made was how much of the minor or major anxieties I might experience in daily life were actually tied to how I (in my body) felt so disconnected from the earth. A subtle state of constant falling and catching myself. Wobbling. Fighting to hold myself up. My head was literally disconnected from a sense of connection and place in the world. Anxiety. But, just like you will discover the nuances of your current pathological state, you will also discover your body's miraculous ability to find its way 'home'. Moving closer and closer to the natural harmonized state that the body was designed to occupy. The sense of peace that has come with the learning of this ability to balance peacefully and somewhat (I still have a ways to go) effortless in gravity, with the support of the earth's gravitational pull, has had incredible implications on my life.

As you deepen your ability to align the body in its most naturally balanced and aligned state, in relation to the earth's gravity, the more you will be able to bring this depth of bodily condition to your movement-based practices, and in turn your everyday life.

A Different Conception of Strength

Qi Gongs' conception of strength can feel very different from that of more western conceptions like bodybuilding. Instead of strength being seen as the accumulation of muscle mass down, Qi Gongs' sense of strength is built on this notion of an entire system working in unison down to its most foundational level. There is a difference between fitness and health. While someone may be able to lift 600lbs, that does not tell you about the internal condition of their joints, their organs, and so on. While more external forms of exercise ( think calisthenics, weight lifting, or more 'hard' forms of martial arts ) are important forms of bodily development, those are seen as outer expressions of an internal structure. Much like adding fibers to the wires of an electrical system, it helps in the transference of electrical currents, but it is just part of a bigger electrical system which includes transformers and generators and the like. If the generator is down, the wires don't mean jack.

In Qi Gong practices instead of working out, you are 'working in.'

A Well Rounded Practice

Hopefully, this document has given you a good jumping-off point as you explore your interests in these powerful healing practices. Like any set of practices, it is important to have a dynamic and well-rounded routine. At first, this can often mean a period of experimentation. Eventually finding forms of practice that make the most sense to your character and approach. This said, as you are getting into this whole world of Qi Gong, I believe it is important to approach it from multiple angles, as each form of practice informs the next in new and dynamic ways.

As you develop your meditative practices (both standing and sitting), your movement-based practice will begin to take on new dimensions. Vice versa as you expand your sense of movement in the world, your sitting practice will open up to you in profoundly new ways. Let us not forget our diet either, as this is fundamental to our cellular condition, and thus our lived experience. Having a proper diet will increase your depth of practice tenfold. It will be the fuel of which every other facet is driven by.

So a well-rounded Qi Gong practice might include

-Diet
-Sitting meditation
-Medical Qi Gong forms
-Martial Qi Gong forms
-More external practices like calisthenics and lifting, or 'hard/external' martial arts like karate jujitsu taekwondo, or any of the many martial forms across the world


Additional Resources

Here is a list of authors and some of their books that have helped me in my developing practice. The books I will list are ones that I think serve well as an entry point into the practice, as opposed to more advanced texts.

Dr. Yang Jwing Ming
This is the gentleman in the video I posted above. He has done a great deal to preserve these arts. With his lifelong practice of chinese martial Arts, and his PHD in mechanical engineering, he does a wonderful. job of bridging the traditional Chinese worldview with a western audience. His books are dense and scholarly, but also simple to read. They are extremely well structured textbooks. His books are great for beginners and well-traveled alike, some of which get incredibly deep . Ranging from slim and accessible overviews of the practices to dense 600 page tomes about one single breathing technique, and the like. You can find all of his educational materials and more at his website for YMAA (Yang Martial Arts Association)

Qigong for Health and Martial Arts- This is a great slim volume that is accessible but with enough depth to build foundational knowledge you can draw upon. It serves as a great overview of the Qi Gong system, as well as providing exercises as a good jumping-off point

The Essence of Taiji Qigong- This book is an absolute gem for any one interested in learn Tai Chi. It is slim and accessible, while at the same time being dense and rich with knowledge. It is the perfect foundational place to begin a solid Tai Chi practice

Bruce Frantzis
This guy was instrumental in bringing a lot of these practices to America back in the 70's and 80's. He lived in China a good deal of time studying with masters who held the traditions of different lineages of practice. He was one of the primary connections of these masters to the states, teaching their knowledge in America, as well as flying them overseas to teach. His teaching is clear, concise, and easy to put into practice.

The Power of Internal Martial are: Combat Secrets of Ba Gua, Taichi, and Hsing-i - This book is one part personal memoir, one part theoretical overview, and one part practical manual. It covers Bruces own journey in discovering the internal arts, his travels to china, and the masters he met. It is often inspiring. You learn about the cultural significance of these art forms through the stories of the masters he was training with. It will also give you a solid overview of the principles of Tai Chi, Bagua, and Xing Yi so that you can understand the similarities and differences in these forms. As well as provide solid foundation to begin a practice. It does not provide lengthy descriptions of each movement in a given form though, so that will have to be found in other reading material

Opening the Energy Gates of Your Body- This is a solid and accessible overview of the basic principles used in Qi Gong movement exercises

You can also find Bruce Frantsiz on his youtube channel and website Energy Arts. Here are two solid videos that can offer a great deal of insight and clarity into these practices.
You may notice he moves a bit oddly in his hips. This is due to a number of car accidents he had where the doctors were going to fuse his spine together. They told him he would never walk again. He opted instead to heal himself with these practices. Watching these videos you almost wouldn't believe that this is a man who was 'never going to walk again'


Mantak Chia

Mantak Chias teachings can veer more into the realms of esoterica for my personal taste but he is a well-known and respected figure in the community for a reason. There is a great deal of depth to his teachings. For the more secular reader, if you can get past some of the more 'wu wu' elements you will find rich new insights that can be applied practically to the practice

Taoist Teachings of love: Cultivating Male Sexual Energy- Buy a copy for yourself
Taoist Secrets of Love: Cultivation Female Sexual Energy- Have enough copies for the closest connection in your rotation

The Inner Structure of Tai Chi- The name says it all. This book does a fantastic job at outlining the more nuanced sensations of the inner-felt experience of the taichi practice. With in-depth descriptions of all of the expanding, contracting, twisting, turning, sinking, rising (and so on) that goes on in your body during each form.
Stray dog you helped me out last year with some wheeling girls on this site so thanks for that I won’t forget that help

been out of this forum for abit stuck in a relationship hahaha was good while it lasted but back here and excited to get back to reading this seduction lifestyle stuff

anyway crazy u talked about this kinda stuff I’ve been into it for a long time I recommend to you to check out my master Waysun Liao https://taichitaocenter.com
Has a couple books has a website with do it yourself stuff and has weekly classes in Taichi that they started during Covid
I can say I trust his mentorship and that tai chi transformed me and have felt things that your regular individual has not through this type of work
I see a lot of dudes with social and stress issues on this site that could use this stuff but this isn’t the site for that and I’m not trying to market someone else’s business however just wanted to link u with this Master if this is something you’re interested in
 

miker

Space Monkey
space monkey
Joined
Jan 27, 2022
Messages
59
This is in response to forum members' inquiry into the role of taichi in the practices of sexual cultivation as outlined in this thread here https://www.skilledseducer.com/threads/how-to-draw-orgasms-up-your-spine.26872/

I figured I would just give a very general overview of these practices, and how they relate to each other. You will also find some basic mindsets, and concepts, I feel will be helpful for approaching these practices. As well as some tips on how to find a teacher, and some additional reading material for those of you compelled to dig deeper.


Qi Gong Practices

Qi Gong (or Chi Kung. Different Chinese dialects) is a whole system of practices. The words roughly translate to Energy Work. Qi, the energy that runs through all existence. Gong, a skill acquired through hard work and discipline. Gong Fu (Kung Fu) is any skill that is acquired through hard work and discipline. So basket weaving, or math, can be Kung Fu as much as knowing how to defend one's body in self defense. Or, healing the body and mind, bringing them back to their most harmonious natural state. Kung Fu
enter-the-dragon-japanese-style_u-L-F4S80Y0.jpg


As you are reading through these, keep in mind though each practice is it's own form, they all share similar principles, as Qi Gong as a whole is one system of thought. Here are a few of the branches of this rich system

Medical Qi Gong: Acupuncture, Herbs, Diet. Personally, I have had better results with other systems of diet, but that's just me. Also have had pretty compelling experiences with herbs and acupuncture, but that's just me. Obviously very different from a western understanding of medicine. Pros and cons to everything. Diet is crucial for a well-rounded holistic practice.

Mediation/Spiritual Development: This includes the sexual cultivation practices I outlined above, but also includes many forms of mental and spiritual development mediations. Different ways of training your mind, awareness, and attention. Sexual cultivation practices, like the ones I outlined on the forum link above, will often be found in this branch of qi gong. Taoist and Buddhist monks use these practices to achieve different states of mind conducive to their spiritual aims. These states of mind can range from dream-like states to deeply focused or restful states. Spiritual enlightenment is often cited as the ultimate pursuit of these practices, but I wouldn't say that one must subscribe to that school of thought in order to find a great deal of value in these practices.

Medical movement practices (this is what is commonly referred to when people in the west say they are practicing Qi Gong) These are body conditioning exercises. There are a lot of forms of this practice. I personally like the 'silk-reeling' forms which are designed to change the physiological condition of your muscular tissues, and your connective tissues, as well as reintegrate your central nervous system, and stimulate your organ functions. I also enjoy marrow-washing exercises, in which you meditate all the way down into your bone marrow (yes, we have nerve endings all the way into our bone marrow) and circulate your attention all the way through your body. This is one of the most profoundly relaxing and rejuvenating exercises I have discovered. These medical qi gong practices are designed to unwind pathological patterns of movements and thinking. Aligning the body and mind to their most harmonious, and vital state of being.

Tai Chi (Tai Ji in some dialects), Baguazhang, Xing Yi Quan (spelled Hsing-I in some dialects): These are the three 'internal' martial arts of china. They are martial forms that utilize the same principles found in the medical movements of qi gong. However, the forms are designed to channel more force through the body, as well as be applied in combat situations.

Tai chi (taichi roughly translates to the 'state of duality', this is yin and eternally at play with one another), the most commonly known 'internal' martial art. It consists of long-flowing movements. It is both linear and circular in form.

Baghuazhang (8 trigrams palm, based on the 8 trigrams of the i-ching. My personal fave to practice) consists of many circular twisting movements. The forms are practiced while walking in a circle, the body torquing in multiple directions at once. Walking the circle is extremely fun and trance-inducing. It is said Baguazhang was created to fight 8 people at once (yeah right)

Xing Yi Quan ( roughly translate to Form Will Fists) is often called the 'brave or foolish way' for its linear, forward-charging, explosive movements. Developed for the Chinese military way back in the day, It is used to just barrel through your enemy at all costs. It is said that Xing Yi Quan is very helpful in developing a mind that focuses on a goal and achieves it, but it is also known for being ruthless. The whole Ying Yi Quan system is based on the 'five elements theory.' Metal, water, wood, fire, and earth. There is a 'fist' (read; form) for each elements. This internal martial art is the most simple in terms of the number of movements used in it's system

It is often disputed how effective these 'martial arts' are in real-world combat, and I can totally understand why. Over the centuries the more martial applications have been lost to flowery dance-like forms, losing a lot of 'root' to the practice. The 'martial' applications being more about show than anything. The people's revolution in china played a huge roll in this, when nearly 70% of traditional Taoist documents were burned. Many martial art and medical forms were band, and those caught practicing them where often killed or sent to labor camps. The practice basically became synonymous with old people. I have only met a small number of people that I felt could convincingly use these forms in a fight. And even then it was just one small tool in their bigger tool kit. That said, I do believe there are viable self defense applications to these arts. Just rare to see it done well. The movements themselves are very counter-intuitive, and the amount of practice/dicipline it takes to develop the physiological conditions to perform them well is rather staggering. Traditionally, in some schools, you would stand in one posture for a whole year before you started to learn other movements.

A Quality of Body Condition
Note the quality of movements this man performs at the 2:13 time mark (the entire video is informative for any one new to the practice)

Did you see how he is sort of 'sinking' into the earth, almost as if he is magnetized to it, his whole tendon body wrapping, twisting, turning in unison? The whole body a continuum, each piece relating to the next. Almost like one bid rubbery suit working in unison. Did you notice this quality of sinking downward but also pulling force upward from the earth through his entire structure? The force moving through one clear pathway, like the force through a whip, or an electrical current through a series of wires. It may be tricky to notice these qualities at first, but go compare it with other clips of taichi and see if you can notice the difference. More so than it can be seen, this quality can be felt. Especially when you push hands with someone who has it. It is literally as though you are pushing against the earth through their body and when they move, the force of the earth moves back up through their body to meet you. They do all this while remaining incredibly relaxed, they are not using tension or muscular force, but the body's natural structure and mechanics as an entire unit.


Finding a good teacher
This is what you want to look for in a teacher. This distinctive body condition, along with a palpable way of divulging otherwise esoteric information. While sometimes helpful, an over-reliance (which you see very often) on esoteric concepts, or visualization exercises, can lead to a rootless form. Flowery but lacking the physiological condition necessary for the full benefits of the practice. Visualization is just a map. Relying on it is like asking someone about the soil quality in Montana and they pull out a map of Montana and point to the soil. While visualization might be helpful to lead you there, it is crucial it matches up with a felt physiological sense. Better yet visualizations should rise from the felt physiological sense. Let the terrain inform the map.

When looking for a teacher inquire into their approach by asking about this physiological condition. Ask for a demonstration of it. Ask how they have come to develop it. Ask to push hands to see if you can feel it. Also, you may find a teacher who has a strong development in regards to this body condition, but you don't resonate with their philosophy and approach. You may even find guys who have questionable standards of ethics. I have met some pretty scary dudes (sure loved their violent altercations) who 'had it' in some regards but not others. You will have to ask yourself how much you are willing to stick around in order to get good knowledge. Some teachers may be more adapt at the more medative/spiritual forms of this practice, some at the more physical/martial forms. At first, you may have to piece together knowledge from a few sources (without watering down the practice), until you find a teacher who you gel with on many levels.

Also, watch out for teachers whose idea of 'soft' or 'relaxed' leaves their form floppy like a wet noodle. This is bad practice, and very common. What you are looking for is a 'fullness' as if the body is inflated like a balloon. Full, But not tense. When you push your finger into a balloon the rubbery outside yields, but the inside remains full, and the entire structure of the balloon remains intact and connected (unless you pop it of course). In these practices, 'softness' and relaxation are possible because that relaxation is supported by the body's form and structure underneath. As well as the support from the earth below our feet. Relaxed, but energized and alert. I know this may sound esoteric but I guarantee you will know it when you see it, and even more so when you feel it.

And remember, your body is the ultimate teacher. He is the one who holds the wisdom and knowledge you seek, as long as you learn to listen.


Metaphor Meets Body
This is how a see a lot of the traditional teachings of these practices, they are clever metaphors that help describe the felt experience of physics and physiology. This may be why the west has a hard time accepting these practices. The sort of subjective nature of these sensory experiences, the language around them, and also some outdated superstitious esotericism thrown into some linages of teaching. Once you understand the language in traditional teachings to be more of metaphor for felt experience it can start to make sense. Drawing 'energy' up your spine is less ephemeral when you understand it to be a method of scanning your awaness through your physiological state and inducing specific physiological responses that are conducive to holistic forms of healing. The feeling of energy being the felt sense of your blood, the cells in your tissues, the cerebral spinal fluids, the lymphatic fluids, your central nervous system, the functions of your organs, and so on. The systems of metaphor surrounding these practices are simply common language practitioners developed to discuss these felt senses. In your practice, some of these metaphors may make more sense to you than others. I have been continually surprised at just how much sense they make in terms of a felt experience. With this said, it also makes sense why these practices are so often misunderstood. How many people have developed the ability to feel all the way into their bone marrow, then come up with a clear way of describing that feeling, in a manner that helps others achieve a similar awareness?

Standing Like a Tree (Post stand, or tree post standing, as it is commonly referred to)

This is an absolutely foundational practice that will deepen all other forms of practice 100-fold. It is a practice often left out of many schools, yet so crucial for a true understanding of these practices.

Basically, you stand in a series of postures for extended periods of time. During these long periods of standing, the pathological holding patterns you have in your body begin to burn out. By following a series of guiding principles, you create conditions in your body that are conducive to the unwinding of these holding patterns, as well as the realigning of your entire physiological system in relation to gravity. This aids in the cultivation of a body condition where the top of your head is seamlessly in relation with the earth, and vice versa the surface of the earth is pressing back up towards the top of your head. This creates a clear channel in your structural anatomy that allows the body to find its most balanced and integrated sense of being.

This is a practice of personal discovery. You begin to notice every minute detail of how you hold yourself, how you relate to yourself, and how you relate to physical reality (such as your connection to the earth's gravitational pull). In this, you may even discover how your social relations manifest themselves in your body perception, and pathological holding patterns. For example, one discovery I made was how much of the minor or major anxieties I might experience in daily life were actually tied to how I (in my body) felt so disconnected from the earth. A subtle state of constant falling and catching myself. Wobbling. Fighting to hold myself up. My head was literally disconnected from a sense of connection and place in the world. Anxiety. But, just like you will discover the nuances of your current pathological state, you will also discover your body's miraculous ability to find its way 'home'. Moving closer and closer to the natural harmonized state that the body was designed to occupy. The sense of peace that has come with the learning of this ability to balance peacefully and somewhat (I still have a ways to go) effortless in gravity, with the support of the earth's gravitational pull, has had incredible implications on my life.

As you deepen your ability to align the body in its most naturally balanced and aligned state, in relation to the earth's gravity, the more you will be able to bring this depth of bodily condition to your movement-based practices, and in turn your everyday life.

A Different Conception of Strength

Qi Gongs' conception of strength can feel very different from that of more western conceptions like bodybuilding. Instead of strength being seen as the accumulation of muscle mass down, Qi Gongs' sense of strength is built on this notion of an entire system working in unison down to its most foundational level. There is a difference between fitness and health. While someone may be able to lift 600lbs, that does not tell you about the internal condition of their joints, their organs, and so on. While more external forms of exercise ( think calisthenics, weight lifting, or more 'hard' forms of martial arts ) are important forms of bodily development, those are seen as outer expressions of an internal structure. Much like adding fibers to the wires of an electrical system, it helps in the transference of electrical currents, but it is just part of a bigger electrical system which includes transformers and generators and the like. If the generator is down, the wires don't mean jack.

In Qi Gong practices instead of working out, you are 'working in.'

A Well Rounded Practice

Hopefully, this document has given you a good jumping-off point as you explore your interests in these powerful healing practices. Like any set of practices, it is important to have a dynamic and well-rounded routine. At first, this can often mean a period of experimentation. Eventually finding forms of practice that make the most sense to your character and approach. This said, as you are getting into this whole world of Qi Gong, I believe it is important to approach it from multiple angles, as each form of practice informs the next in new and dynamic ways.

As you develop your meditative practices (both standing and sitting), your movement-based practice will begin to take on new dimensions. Vice versa as you expand your sense of movement in the world, your sitting practice will open up to you in profoundly new ways. Let us not forget our diet either, as this is fundamental to our cellular condition, and thus our lived experience. Having a proper diet will increase your depth of practice tenfold. It will be the fuel of which every other facet is driven by.

So a well-rounded Qi Gong practice might include

-Diet
-Sitting meditation
-Medical Qi Gong forms
-Martial Qi Gong forms
-More external practices like calisthenics and lifting, or 'hard/external' martial arts like karate jujitsu taekwondo, or any of the many martial forms across the world


Additional Resources

Here is a list of authors and some of their books that have helped me in my developing practice. The books I will list are ones that I think serve well as an entry point into the practice, as opposed to more advanced texts.

Dr. Yang Jwing Ming
This is the gentleman in the video I posted above. He has done a great deal to preserve these arts. With his lifelong practice of chinese martial Arts, and his PHD in mechanical engineering, he does a wonderful. job of bridging the traditional Chinese worldview with a western audience. His books are dense and scholarly, but also simple to read. They are extremely well structured textbooks. His books are great for beginners and well-traveled alike, some of which get incredibly deep . Ranging from slim and accessible overviews of the practices to dense 600 page tomes about one single breathing technique, and the like. You can find all of his educational materials and more at his website for YMAA (Yang Martial Arts Association)

Qigong for Health and Martial Arts- This is a great slim volume that is accessible but with enough depth to build foundational knowledge you can draw upon. It serves as a great overview of the Qi Gong system, as well as providing exercises as a good jumping-off point

The Essence of Taiji Qigong- This book is an absolute gem for any one interested in learn Tai Chi. It is slim and accessible, while at the same time being dense and rich with knowledge. It is the perfect foundational place to begin a solid Tai Chi practice

Bruce Frantzis
This guy was instrumental in bringing a lot of these practices to America back in the 70's and 80's. He lived in China a good deal of time studying with masters who held the traditions of different lineages of practice. He was one of the primary connections of these masters to the states, teaching their knowledge in America, as well as flying them overseas to teach. His teaching is clear, concise, and easy to put into practice.

The Power of Internal Martial are: Combat Secrets of Ba Gua, Taichi, and Hsing-i - This book is one part personal memoir, one part theoretical overview, and one part practical manual. It covers Bruces own journey in discovering the internal arts, his travels to china, and the masters he met. It is often inspiring. You learn about the cultural significance of these art forms through the stories of the masters he was training with. It will also give you a solid overview of the principles of Tai Chi, Bagua, and Xing Yi so that you can understand the similarities and differences in these forms. As well as provide solid foundation to begin a practice. It does not provide lengthy descriptions of each movement in a given form though, so that will have to be found in other reading material

Opening the Energy Gates of Your Body- This is a solid and accessible overview of the basic principles used in Qi Gong movement exercises

You can also find Bruce Frantsiz on his youtube channel and website Energy Arts. Here are two solid videos that can offer a great deal of insight and clarity into these practices.
You may notice he moves a bit oddly in his hips. This is due to a number of car accidents he had where the doctors were going to fuse his spine together. They told him he would never walk again. He opted instead to heal himself with these practices. Watching these videos you almost wouldn't believe that this is a man who was 'never going to walk again'


Mantak Chia

Mantak Chias teachings can veer more into the realms of esoterica for my personal taste but he is a well-known and respected figure in the community for a reason. There is a great deal of depth to his teachings. For the more secular reader, if you can get past some of the more 'wu wu' elements you will find rich new insights that can be applied practically to the practice

Taoist Teachings of love: Cultivating Male Sexual Energy- Buy a copy for yourself
Taoist Secrets of Love: Cultivation Female Sexual Energy- Have enough copies for the closest connection in your rotation

The Inner Structure of Tai Chi- The name says it all. This book does a fantastic job at outlining the more nuanced sensations of the inner-felt experience of the taichi practice. With in-depth descriptions of all of the expanding, contracting, twisting, turning, sinking, rising (and so on) that goes on in your body during each form.
Tai chi is moving meditation….meditation while moving….the grand ultimate https://taichitaocenter.com/
 
Top