Does anyone think there's something bigger going on than the Covid-19 itself?

DaVinciMatrixStyle

Space Monkey
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I have a friend I met who keeps sending me these videos about how this is the plan of the "NWO".

A. They're killing the fiat currency to digital currency slowly in order for the govt to have control over your money (Ex. Digital Yuan)
B. Mandated Vaccine Passports (On the surface it's a choice, but in reality it's more like if you don't have vaccine, you can't do X)
C. Institutions mandating their stuff to get vaccines
D. Trying to make masks and lockdowns the 'new norm'

So he's hellbent on refusing to get vaccines, pulling money out of the bank into crypto, and finding a new passport

I found this interesting because I agree with
A. Fiat currency is dying.
B. I did find it odd that my college is mandating students to get vaccinated and not providing options for online coursework
C. I'm not sure about the other 2 yet.

I'm curious about what other people think.
 

ZacAdam

Cro-Magnon Man
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We Girlschase members had this on the chat.

It was quite interesting. Here's what we thought

- It's something insidious
- Politicians are generally stupid
- Testing how much the public can tolerate
- Seeing how long can we lower property prices so that we can snap them at $0.60 to a $1.00

We all kinda agree that it started out as a real pandemic and after that it was utilized for money.

They slowly pushing climate change if you watch CNN technical director leaked video. And they are pushing it now.

But on a serious level, India is suffering because of their third world structures and culture. So it is good to be balance and recognize that this is a real pandemic and India are having a real structural breakdown right now, not only pandemic but literally gender warfare, farming and everything.

z@c+
 
Last edited:

Phoenix

Cro-Magnon Man
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551
Smart friend there. Yes, if you are being coerced into something, then it's not good for you. "Take the vaccine, or else...". I'm not getting it. It's sus as fuck tbh.
 

DaVinciMatrixStyle

Space Monkey
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Smart friend there. Yes, if you are being coerced into something, then it's not good for you. "Take the vaccine, or else...". I'm not getting it. It's sus as fuck tbh.
I haven't it gotten it myself. I'm waiting til at least til the end of the year to see how it changes.
 

Vision

Space Monkey
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The college thing isn't surprising... they've been fighting people's abilities to replace college with online stuff for a long time now. Most of the value that a lot of people see in going to college is the lifestyle that comes with it... drinking, partying, unprotected sex... and they charge like $500 for a book and it would be a lot more difficult to justify that if they were just PDF documents.

The vaccine is definitely sketchy, at best. In the last year, I've traveled to six countries, gone to giant events with over a hundred people where we were hugging and shit... still haven't gotten the coronavirus. Although a lot of my friends have gotten it. My ex just got it, she had it for two days and she said it was like having the cold... brother said the same thing.

I'm just grateful that I have an online business. I honestly have no idea how people are surviving. That government money isn't keeping anyone afloat, there's no way.
 

Chase

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I can't get too involved in politics... however...

I will just say, with the wealth transfer (US middle class: -$3.9 trillion over the past year; US billionaires: +$3.7 trillion over the past year) and insane money printing (1/3 of circulating money printed in the past year), it's not unwise to look for places to sock money away where its value won't totally piss away over the next several years. Crypto's looked promising for a while (I've followed it since 2011 and it keeps looking better and better; we also just started accepting Bitcoin payments for products on Girls Chase) but of course nothing's guaranteed.

If you're afraid of fiat losing tons of value fast (and that fear is not unreasonable, I'd say), the places people are socking their money away instead are:

  • Stocks
  • Real estate
  • Cryptocurrencies
  • Precious metals

There are advantages and disadvantages to each of these.

Good advice for investors is typically to be diversified, since you don't really know for sure what will happen in the future.

Keep in mind that while the media claims "inflation is not really a problem", 2020 inflation was 10% if measured the way they calculated inflation in 1980. 2021 inflation will be higher. Here's Warren Buffet on that subject, from a meeting held just yesterday:


Even if you go by current inflation measurements, inflation was 50% between the year 2000 and the year 2020 (i.e., money lost 1/3 its buying power over those 20 years). That is nuts. And that was before all this wild money printing began.

The CBDCs the governments are all abuzz about are totally identical to the fiat currencies they're currently printing with abandon. They have nothing in common with cryptocurrencies and are more or less a marketing stunt. The way the politicians and billionaires have talked about their upcoming Great Reset, you'd be forgiven for thinking they intend to print the existing fiat currencies into oblivion, then hold a debt jubilee, and start issuing a monthly CBDC stipend to their citizens... so long as those citizens behaved doubleplus good, of course.

Also, they are not driving property prices to zero. At least not now. Due to both high general inflation and governments using the money they print to purchase mortgage bonds, real estate prices are booming. It's true in the US and it's true in other countries I've looked at. The price of lumber has exploded almost 300% I think it is in the US, due to all the new home construction (no one is selling their homes; nobody wants to trade real estate, which is going up, for cash, which is going down). Lumber's gone up even faster than oil (and crude oil, heating oil, and gasoline are all up by over 100% in the past year... I think on average around +150%?), and oil is generally the first thing to go up, since it's what the biggest holders of USD (i.e., nations other than the US, who must keep USD reserves due to the US's hold over Middle Eastern oil exports) spend the lion's share of their USD on. Everything else (food prices, etc.) follows.

Also -- I'm wary of saying anything negative about the vaccine.

I will say that as a marketer, I have been extremely impressed with the vaccine product launch. They hit all the points with it. Scarcity, urgency, driving in the pain points, building a sense of community, handling objections, etc.

They have at various times in the MSM interviewed various crowd psychology and health psychology people who have been involved in this vaccine rollout. It's clear they have a very capable marketing team thinking through getting as many arms inoculated in as little time as possible.

As far as compulsory (or effectively compulsory; e.g., "it's a private company... it's just that every private company requires it") vaccination, I will just say... it might be wise to find yourself in a part of your country or the world that is not making a big vaccine push, soon rather than later. Because they are shutting borders down and have signaled that they will not be letting people out once they have these digital vaccine passes fully deployed.

Usually, historically, when countries start shutting their borders so people cannot leave, anyone too slow to get out while the getting was good is going to be stuck there for a few rough decades as it all goes to hell in a hand basket. Pick your favorite authoritarian revolution of the past 100 years and look what happened inside the country once the borders closed and the rush to emigrate was cut off. "Well we can't just let any old person leave! You have to be one of the approved citizens to go abroad!" is all you need to tell me to get me booked on a one-way flight outta dodge. Just me personally.

In the grand scheme of things... where in the world where people have freedom of speech and movement and association is always in flux.

Much of the time, peasants are trapped on the land they were born in, disallowed from emigration, subject to the whims of their lords.

From a more cyclical point of view, it is normal for societies to alternate between periods of freedom and periods of oppression. These alternations tend to take centuries though, so when it happens usually it is the first time it has happened in the lifetime of anyone who is living. So it feels bizarre and unprecedented and people have trouble believing it is happening.

Either an unprecedented opening up, if you're in a time of growing freedom... or the reverse, if you're in a time of the reverse.

As always, I refer people interested in these cycles to this great introductory article on civilization life cycles:


And if you like that, get Joseph Tainter's book The Collapse of Complex Societies. It explains a lot.

Chase
 

DarkKnight

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Chase, how come all these countries who are supposedly political enemies all engage in the same covid bullshit? Are they pretend enemies and behind the scenes great friends? Because that is what I am leaning too right now.
 

Chase

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@DarkKnight,

Chase, how come all these countries who are supposedly political enemies all engage in the same covid bullshit? Are they pretend enemies and behind the scenes great friends? Because that is what I am leaning too right now.

Well... let me put it as succinctly as I can.

Which will still not be that succinct, but here we go:

On the geopolitical scene, you have the international banking sphere, centered primarily in the US and UK, and you have those outside the this sphere. The US is the most powerful member of this sphere, with USD serving as the core vehicle for maintenance of a global financial empire. This empire is called by various names... the US empire, Western Civilization, etc. I'll just call it "US" for now, even though it's really an international global financial empire.

The empire-aligned nations have various degrees of closeness to this empire. Some are militarily occupied, like Germany and Japan (within both of which the US maintains many tens of thousands of active-duty troops), and have a love-hate relationship with this empire / the US. Others are more loosely tied to this international system and waver back and forth between flirting with independent foreign policy before being reined back into the system. Hungary, Poland, Italy, India, Turkey, Brazil, and the Philippines are all good examples of this. Still others are recent converts, courtesy regime change operations, such as Iraq and Ukraine. And others are very tightly woven into this system, and are integral parts of it, most importantly the US, UK, Israel, and Saudi Arabia.

The way this empire has maintained financial and global hegemony since Nixon abandoned Bretton Woods and the gold standard in 1971 has been by creating a situation where to buy oil you must have dollars. Everyone needs oil, lots of oil, and since the US has set up a situation where oil-exporting countries have agreed to only accept oil for dollars, every country must keep large amounts of dollars on-hand. This lets the US economy basically be able to grow regardless what the US does, because the US can always print more money, devaluing the money held by those holding USD, which is in the main all these other countries. Thus the US can unilaterally transfer money from all other nations on Earth to itself. If you are another country and you want to use oil, you must pay this "dollar tax" to the US to do so.

This also means that the US (and, by extension, the big banks who are the real kingmakers here; remember, the US Federal Reserve, which prints the money, is privately owned by the big banks, which are in turn privately owned by wealthy banking families) has the power to totally destroy your nation on a whim. Anger the US (i.e., the banks)? It can slap sanctions on you that make it much harder for you to get dollars, which makes it much harder for you to buy oil, which is a crisis for any country. The US can also use its huge military (bolstered by all this "tax the world" stuff) to push people around as well. Thus, most countries today are somewhere in the US sphere.

However, this empire has grown increasingly costly for the US to maintain. Many countries in the Middle East have tried to get out from under the US's thumb and sell their oil for whatever currency they want. The US needs to either cajole them back or it needs to regime change them. This is why key allies in the Middle Eastern region are so, so important to the US, and considered by the US to be 'greatest allies' despite seemingly not doing anything (these great allies are footholds into the region that allow the US to project force there and maintain US dollar ascendency).

The Taliban's Afghanistan, Saddam Hussein's Iraq, and Muammar Gaddafi's Libya were all selling oil for currencies other than dollars. They all got regime changed. That left only Iran and Syria as countries selling oil for currencies other than dollars in the Middle East. US-backed Al'Qaeda & ISIS fighters were destroying Syria, and the US was saber-rattling against Iran, but then Syria asked for Russian aid. Russia began assisting Syria, then Americans elected Donald Trump, who proceeded to cut funding to the CIA for the food/water drops, air cover, weapons, and training it was providing ISIS. With American support removed and Russia aiding the Syrians, ISIS fled Syria and Syria mopped up the stragglers.

There is now a loose confederation of states, not really aligned with each other, but increasingly pushed together out of necessity by the Western financial empire, that are not a part of this system and have resisted submission to it. Those states are:

  • Russia
  • China
  • North Korea
  • Belarus
  • Iran
  • Syria
  • Venezuela

Russia is the most immediate threat to the Western banking empire, because it is now assisting both Syria and Iran to avoid US regime-change operations. But China is another grave threat, with its alternative economic system (Belt & Road initiative). It also just signed a 30-year deal with Iran for oil, reported all over the Western MSM. Not in the Western MSM anywhere is the fact that the deal was for oil in CNY.

Venezuela and Iran are working together too. They are conducting transactions in Bitcoin to evade US sanctions (the Bank of England also seized Venezuela's $1.8 billion in gold, which was being stored in the UK). Iran and North Korea have worked together as well, sharing nuclear technology to build deterrents to try to keep out foreign militaries / regime change operations.

If you look at those seven countries, you will notice they have all just done very limited, light lockdowns compared to the West:

  • Russia did a lockdown for under 2 months and has been totally open internally since then

  • China did a lockdown for 2 months and has been totally open internally since then (they were having maskless pool parties and concerts in Wuhan last summer, for instance)

  • North Korea had a lockdown on a city bordering South Korea for several weeks. Aside from that, there does not seem to be anything else reported, other than various 'anonymous sources say' atrocity propaganda about super strict lockdowns and people starving to death in their houses and getting shot trying to escape, which I don't know if it's true or not but it sounds a lot like the usual North Korea atrocity propaganda... I would urge skepticism

  • Belarus didn't lock down at all

  • Iran avoided nationwide lockdowns and has done a few city lockdowns for a few weeks at a time that were only lightly enforced

  • Syria, I can't find any news about lockdowns, other than in the Kurdish-controlled Northeast (which is aligned with the US empire, against Syria proper... so it is going along with the Western lockdown agenda)

  • Venezuela did a 2-month lockdown, then has had a few short lockdowns (e.g., 7 days at a time) since then

These seven countries are the "bad" countries, that resist giving control of their nations/economies to the international banks.

They are also coincidentally the ones with the lightest lockdowns for the most part.

I was sad to see Sweden give in to all the international pressure to do a lockdown, even after its non-locked down death rate was significantly lower than neighboring locked down countries, proportionate to its population size and density.

Mexico is a West-aligned nation that has no official lockdown policy, and is totally regional about its lockdowns (some states are heavily locked down, some aren't locked down at all). I think that is more because it's a chaotic, partly lawless failed state, and the West isn't going to worry about trying to go in there and impose lockdowns on that mess.

But, basically, that is your situation:

  1. US/UK-aligned international bank-held countries do strict lockdowns. Many SUPER super strict, like France and Chile. Many of these countries have huge mass protests that get largely ignored by Western media and are having little effect on the politicians

  2. States detached from the international banks have locked down only lightly, or not at all. However, these states are currently all being targeted for regime change (Belarus was hit with a CIA color revolution and its president nearly assassinated) or they are being sanctioned and threatened militarily (like the Ukrainian push up to Donbass that nearly kicked off WWIII a week ago... only averted when the speed of Russia's deployment of a massive military to the Ukrainian border spooked the West into not attacking)

It ultimately comes down to "how tied into the international banking empire is a country?"

If it is tied into it, it is going to do these lockdowns, or risk being pushed out.

The only countries not tied to it are the two other superpowers (Russia & China) big enough to weather US sanctions and pressure the US back, plus a few smaller states with high moats, who are dealing with each other and the non-Western superpowers.

These countries have done limited lockdowns, but they haven't had any reason to implode their economies like the West has, and they don't have populist uprisings they need to crush the way the West does. So they haven't had a need to go into a long, prolonged, destructive lockdown situation.

Chase
 

Train

Tool-Bearing Hominid
Tool-Bearing Hominid
Joined
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Messages
230
@DarkKnight,



Well... let me put it as succinctly as I can.

Which will still not be that succinct, but here we go:

On the geopolitical scene, you have the international banking sphere, centered primarily in the US and UK, and you have those outside the this sphere. The US is the most powerful member of this sphere, with USD serving as the core vehicle for maintenance of a global financial empire. This empire is called by various names... the US empire, Western Civilization, etc. I'll just call it "US" for now, even though it's really an international global financial empire.

The empire-aligned nations have various degrees of closeness to this empire. Some are militarily occupied, like Germany and Japan (within both of which the US maintains many tens of thousands of active-duty troops), and have a love-hate relationship with this empire / the US. Others are more loosely tied to this international system and waver back and forth between flirting with independent foreign policy before being reined back into the system. Hungary, Poland, Italy, India, Turkey, Brazil, and the Philippines are all good examples of this. Still others are recent converts, courtesy regime change operations, such as Iraq and Ukraine. And others are very tightly woven into this system, and are integral parts of it, most importantly the US, UK, Israel, and Saudi Arabia.

The way this empire has maintained financial and global hegemony since Nixon abandoned Bretton Woods and the gold standard in 1971 has been by creating a situation where to buy oil you must have dollars. Everyone needs oil, lots of oil, and since the US has set up a situation where oil-exporting countries have agreed to only accept oil for dollars, every country must keep large amounts of dollars on-hand. This lets the US economy basically be able to grow regardless what the US does, because the US can always print more money, devaluing the money held by those holding USD, which is in the main all these other countries. Thus the US can unilaterally transfer money from all other nations on Earth to itself. If you are another country and you want to use oil, you must pay this "dollar tax" to the US to do so.

This also means that the US (and, by extension, the big banks who are the real kingmakers here; remember, the US Federal Reserve, which prints the money, is privately owned by the big banks, which are in turn privately owned by wealthy banking families) has the power to totally destroy your nation on a whim. Anger the US (i.e., the banks)? It can slap sanctions on you that make it much harder for you to get dollars, which makes it much harder for you to buy oil, which is a crisis for any country. The US can also use its huge military (bolstered by all this "tax the world" stuff) to push people around as well. Thus, most countries today are somewhere in the US sphere.

However, this empire has grown increasingly costly for the US to maintain. Many countries in the Middle East have tried to get out from under the US's thumb and sell their oil for whatever currency they want. The US needs to either cajole them back or it needs to regime change them. This is why key allies in the Middle Eastern region are so, so important to the US, and considered by the US to be 'greatest allies' despite seemingly not doing anything (these great allies are footholds into the region that allow the US to project force there and maintain US dollar ascendency).

The Taliban's Afghanistan, Saddam Hussein's Iraq, and Muammar Gaddafi's Libya were all selling oil for currencies other than dollars. They all got regime changed. That left only Iran and Syria as countries selling oil for currencies other than dollars in the Middle East. US-backed Al'Qaeda & ISIS fighters were destroying Syria, and the US was saber-rattling against Iran, but then Syria asked for Russian aid. Russia began assisting Syria, then Americans elected Donald Trump, who proceeded to cut funding to the CIA for the food/water drops, air cover, weapons, and training it was providing ISIS. With American support removed and Russia aiding the Syrians, ISIS fled Syria and Syria mopped up the stragglers.

There is now a loose confederation of states, not really aligned with each other, but increasingly pushed together out of necessity by the Western financial empire, that are not a part of this system and have resisted submission to it. Those states are:

  • Russia
  • China
  • North Korea
  • Belarus
  • Iran
  • Syria
  • Venezuela

Russia is the most immediate threat to the Western banking empire, because it is now assisting both Syria and Russia to avoid US regime-change operations. But China is another grave threat, with its alternative economic system (Belt & Road initiative). It also just signed a 30-year deal with Iran for oil, reported all over the Western MSM. Not in the Western MSM anywhere is the fact that the deal was for oil in CNY.

Venezuela and Iran are working together too. They are conducting transactions in Bitcoin to evade US sanctions (the Bank of England also seized Venezuela's $1.8 billion in gold, which was being stored in the UK). Iran and North Korea have worked together as well, sharing nuclear technology to build deterrents to try to keep out foreign militaries / regime change operations.

If you look at those seven countries, you will notice they have all just done very limited, light lockdowns compared to the West:

  • Russia did a lockdown for under 2 months and has been totally open internally since then

  • China did a lockdown for 2 months and has been totally open internally since then (they were having maskless pool parties and concerts in Wuhan last summer, for instance)

  • North Korea had a lockdown on a city bordering South Korea for several weeks. Aside from that, there does not seem to be anything else reported, other than various 'anonymous sources say' atrocity propaganda about super strict lockdowns and people starving to death in their houses and getting shot trying to escape, which I don't know if it's true or not but it sounds a lot like the usual North Korea atrocity propaganda... I would urge skepticism

  • Belarus didn't lock down at all

  • Iran avoided nationwide lockdowns and has done a few city lockdowns for a few weeks at a time that were only lightly enforced

  • Syria, I can't find any news about lockdowns, other than in the Kurdish-controlled Northeast (which is aligned with the US empire, against Syria proper... so it is going along with the Western lockdown agenda)

  • Venezuela did a 2-month lockdown, then has had a few short lockdowns (e.g., 7 days at a time) since then

These seven countries are the "bad" countries, that resist giving control of their nations/economies to the international banks.

They are also coincidentally the ones with the lightest lockdowns for the most part.

I was sad to see Sweden give in to all the international pressure to do a lockdown, even after its non-locked down death rate was significantly lower than neighboring locked down countries, proportionate to its population size and density.

Mexico is a West-aligned nation that has no official lockdown policy, and is totally regional about its lockdowns (some states are heavily locked down, some aren't locked down at all). I think that is more because it's a chaotic, partly lawless failed state, and the West isn't going to worry about trying to go in there and impose lockdowns on that mess.

But, basically, that is your situation:

  1. US/UK-aligned international bank-held countries do strict lockdowns. Many SUPER super strict, like France and Chile. Many of these countries have huge mass protests that get largely ignored by Western media and are having little effect on the politicians

  2. States detached from the international banks have locked down only lightly, or not at all. However, these states are currently all being targeted for regime change (Belarus was hit with a CIA color revolution and its president nearly assassinated) or they are being sanctioned and threatened militarily (like the Ukrainian push up to Donbass that nearly kicked off WWIII a week ago... only averted when the speed of Russia's deployment of a massive military to the Ukrainian border spooked the West into not attacking)

It ultimately comes down to "how tied into the international banking empire is a country?"

If it is tied into it, it is going to do these lockdowns, or risk being pushed out.

The only countries not tied to it are the two other superpowers (Russia & China) big enough to weather US sanctions and pressure the US back, plus a few smaller states with high moats, who are dealing with each other and the non-Western superpowers.

These countries have done limited lockdowns, but they haven't had any reason to implode their economies like the West has, and they don't have populist uprisings they need to crush the way the West does. So they haven't had a need to go into a long, prolonged, destructive lockdown situation.

Chase
Interesting read here, Chase. Is this information that you had to piece together or are there sources that readily provide this info?

It definitely has not come across my mainstream reading, if at all. Probably not as intriguing to most people but seems like good info to know. A lot of the US involvement in the Middle East makes sense now.

I'd be interested in doing similar research for what lies next for the US.

Going by feel based on overall sentiments, pop culture, etc. Seems like the US has peaked (feels like the peak was 1950s, economically speaking) and has been in decline with income inequality, internal bickering, lack of cooperation, etc. And this is coming from someone who is cautious about sensationalism, sky-is-falling media. I'm even doubting an external serious threat like another World War will align the US internally. Just based on how Covid was politicized.
 

DarkKnight

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Messages
861
@Chase that is one hell of a read, next question. Due to lockdown the local economies are being destroyed, one would think this weakens the position of the west towards other countries like Russia and China.. how does this make sense?

Also I read your link about the costs of complexities.. these extreme covid regulations are totally upping complexities in society (and thereby draining the society). How does this make sense from the position of the West? It is incredible self sabotage.
 

Chase

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Messages
3,990
@Train,

Some of it I had to piece together.

I spent a lot of years wondering what the point of US involvement in the Middle East was. I always heard "It's about oil!" but that didn't make complete sense. The US has expended a lot of capital operating over there. Why couldn't we just shift over to nuclear power, or use our own shale oil supplies, or use coal, and then we don't need all that oil?

A lot of it falls into place once you read about the origin of the petrodollar. Then you go look up the countries the US has regime-changed in the Middle East and look for what they all had in common. Some were peaceful, wealthy, secular countries (like Libya). Some were heavily restricted religious countries (like Afghanistan). Only that one thing they all have in common (selling oil for not-dollars).

You also need to read enough about money to understand how money gets its value. This article helped me fill in some gaps on monetary history and how the current system functions:


(reading about the end of Bretton Woods is also enlightening. Once Europe was rebuilt following WWII, the Europeans wanted to start getting out from under the American thumb. So in 1971 the French sent their Navy to US shores to demand the US give them gold in exchange for all the dollars they had. Other European countries heard about this and sent their ships out along with the French. So you had this entire European armada pulling up to the US saying, "Give us our gold, now!" President Nixon ended the gold standard immediately after that, out of fear all the dollars would be turned back in and the US would have to hand out all its gold. But once the gold standard ended, the dollar started to free fall. The US economy stagflated, and was in bad condition. Until -- they tied the dollar to oil. That also makes clear to you what would ever happen should oil become untied from the dollar again)

As for what's next for the US... well, that's hard to say.

The electoral system is no longer functional. But neither is the US at the point where "those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable." The US is still wealthy enough that most people are not living in privation; nobody is starving; the people are soft. They'll go out and LARP at a BLM riot or march single-file into the Capitol building when the police hold the doors open but they're not going to form up battle ranks and seize territory.

Eventually if conditions get bad enough there, you may see people behave in more desperate, revolutionary ways. Unfortunately, intellectual thought is so far degraded that you won't get a new set of Founding Fathers. Instead you'd most likely end up with an ideologue tyrant. People want a strongman to come in and take control of the chaos and bring order to it, so that is what they'll get.

There's a possibility here, which is that the current elites are not omnipotent, but neither are they dumb, and clearly are aware of these historical trends. So they may seek to get out in front of this process and try to ensure that when it comes time for it, a strongman in their pocket ends up power. During the revolutions at the tail end of the Roman Republic, both the populists and the elites had competing strongman champions who took power in successive revolutions (Marius/Cinna for the people; Sulla for the elites; Julius Caesar for the people; Octavian, who ultimately established the new Roman Empire, for the elites).

On the other hand, that doesn't always go the elites' ways. Josef Stalin was an elite-chosen strongman who ultimately turned on the elite who chose him. Vladimir Putin was too (he imprisoned or exiled many of the oligarchs who'd been sucking Russia dry after the USSR collapsed... which was a big betrayal to these oligarchs, because they were the ones who brought him into power!). The US system long hated Cuba because Fidel Castro was a strongman that system put in place, who then turned right around and nationalized US holdings in Cuba and made Cuba independent.

So, you don't know exactly how it will go.

But if I had to make a prediction, right now, I would expect the US to continue as it currently is for at least a few more decades. It'll experience a gradual continued decline in quality of life (as has happened for decades already... as you note), before you have any real strongman attempts at establishing a monarchy. Things aren't bad enough in the US that people are ready to throw out the current system and follow a strong sole leader. The seeds are planted for it, though.

After that, who knows. Maybe you'll see the American Republic transform into an American Empire, the way Rome did. Rome had to go through several decades of pretty extreme public tumult and successive revolutions to get there, though.


@DarkKnight,

As far back as 2017/8, all my economist friends were predicting a massive recession sometime in 2020. I sold all my stocks in 2019 in anticipation of this (ultimately a mistake... but I didn't anticipate this whole bananas situation).

Zillow predicted a housing market collapse bigger than the 2008 collapse. It published data in late 2019 that showed this collapse in housing prices was underway. The same fundamental reasons were there... sub-prime mortgages being sold again, under a different name... overheated real estate market... etc.

All signs pointed to a big reckoning for Western economies in 2020. And at the same time Russia was squeezing the US in the Middle East. Donald Trump, the mortal enemy of this financial empire (they hated him even more than Russia or China), had declawed its Middle Eastern paws.

So no matter what, the West was poised to get its clocked cleaned economically in 2020.

When that happened, the already-restless peasants would've likely responded in a predictable way: fire and pitchforks aimed squarely at the elite.

But then -- COVID!

And everything has completely reversed.

Housing prices are through the roof. Stocks are through the roof. Everyone's getting rich -- except those poor sops dependent on paychecks.

Extreme measures 'necessitated' everyone being locked inside. Not one life could be lost for the economy. Sure, the economy had to suffer, massively, but it was for the greater good. It was wartime. And in wartime, people make sacrifices for neighbor and nation.

What you end up with is a controlled demolition of sections of the Western economies, that was likely to happen anyway. But, fortunately for those in power, rather than the Wall Street fat cats going broke and taxpayers having to bail them out again (which was what would've happened; this may well have collapsed the system), the Wall Street fat cats got richer. This time, rather than pay for bailouts, taxpayers simply got laid off from work and had their businesses closed.

The whole thing is a high wire act though. The Western system had no choice. If it didn't do what it's doing, it likely would've collapsed. Instead, it implodes part of the economy, transfers wealth from poorer to richer, and removes civil liberties to make resistance much harder, and it gets to stay stitched together a while longer.

But, meantime, yes, Russia's star is rising. China's star is rising. Other countries become increasingly more likely to peel out of the US orbit and defect to the Russian/Chinese orbit. If you're in the US orbit, you must implement all these weird "divide & conquer" social justice policies that are highly unpopular with the public, and you must allow the US all its economic privileges that don't serve your country so well.

This is why you see the US getting increasingly shrill about, say, stymying Nordstream 2 (German-Russian economic alliance), China's various Belt & Road initiatives, etc.

It's also why you see all these social media-coordinated (e.g., US-seeded/led) color revolutions all of a sudden in all these disparate countries. Either to put pressure on the main countries they're in the orbit of (the Belarus color revolution to pressure Russia; the Hong Kong color revolution to pressure China) or to flip insufficiently loyal states back to loyalty (Thailand, Myanmar, etc.).

Ultimately this sloppy, chaotic response, where Western governments must treat their subjects as prisoners, meanwhile saber rattling against the rest of the world and sparking color revolutions everywhere, is back-against-the-wall, sick/wounded old tiger behavior. And it is largely because of Donald Trump.

Hillary Clinton, in her presidential candidacy, made clear she was going to enforce a no-fly zone over Syria. No-fly zone = "we shoot down Russian planes" = "we are going to commit to regime change in Syria" = Iran is the only country left in the Middle East opposing US dollar hegemony, Russia is on its back heel, and the international banking empire is secure.

Trump got in and set to work deconstructing this stuff. It opened up a power vacuum for Russia to move in and push the US on the playing field. This is why the American system continually claimed Trump was "working for Russia." He wasn't actually, and if I had to guess probably didn't even understand the geopolitics he was messing around with. He just wanted to bring the troops home and end foreign entanglements. But the end result was the US financial empire took a big, potentially lethal hit, and allowed Russia to gain the momentum.

Meanwhile, at home, there has been a rising populist insurgency against the current regime. Both the populist left and the populist right feel like something is wrong and want to change the system. This is a fire burning right in the heart of the global financial empire. Trump took this smoldering camp fire and turned it into a raging forest fire.

Had Trump been defeated in 2016, the way Sanders was earlier that year, domestic populism would've been swept back under the rug for a time (to need to be dealt with later) and Russia would've been corralled. China, which doesn't like confrontation, would've seen all this and stuck to a softer tone.

Instead, the whole timeline got messed up, and the system is now in a flat-out panic.

This censorship stuff all started after the Trump win. They didn't do any of it before -- they didn't think they needed to. Broad, hurried, emotional censorship is always an admission you are losing the war for hearts and minds.

But the tl;dr is:

This international banking/financial empire was overconfident. It then lost full control over the US, its power center. This loss of control caused some big damage to its tight-but-delicate system of international control. The domestic response has been to lock down the people and elections inside the system to prevent further internal rebellion. Internationally, it has switched into overdrive trying to destabilize foreign powers, who can see this global financial empire has become weak and have become increasingly bold.

You can look at how the Russian and Chinese leaders/diplomats have spoken to and about the US government since the Biden regime took power. Putin called the US "Shere Khan" and its various helper countries "hyenas jumping around it" and threatened a "swift, asymmetric response" if Russia or its interests are attacked. Yang Jiechi, the Chinese Direct of Central Foreign Affairs Commission, told the US it is not in a position to talk down to China and had better watch its tone.

Neither China nor Russia have ever spoken to or about the US like this before. However, likewise, the US has never been nearly so belligerent and chaotic in its diplomacy as it is under this Biden regime.

But the US empire is locked into a path it has no way out of.

It must keep its people cowed, or else deal with full-on rebellion inside itself, which will collapse it.

It must keep its adversaries on their heels, or else deal with them biting off the organs of its financial empire, which, too, will collapse it.

It's really an unenviable position for any system to be in.

The only ways out at this point are probably either eventual collapse, or world war.

But who knows, maybe the elites still have some tricks up their sleeves.

Trump surprised them, but they got him out and regained control. I sure didn't see this COVID thing coming.

Chase
 

Will_V

Space Monkey
space monkey
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
193
@Train,

Some of it I had to piece together.

I spent a lot of years wondering what the point of US involvement in the Middle East was. I always heard "It's about oil!" but that didn't make complete sense. The US has expended a lot of capital operating over there. Why couldn't we just shift over to nuclear power, or use our own shale oil supplies, or use coal, and then we don't need all that oil?

A lot of it falls into place once you read about the origin of the petrodollar. Then you go look up the countries the US has regime-changed in the Middle East and look for what they all had in common. Some were peaceful, wealthy, secular countries (like Libya). Some were heavily restricted religious countries (like Afghanistan). Only that one thing they all have in common (selling oil for not-dollars).

You also need to read enough about money to understand how money gets its value. This article helped me fill in some gaps on monetary history and how the current system functions:


(reading about the end of Bretton Woods is also enlightening. Once Europe was rebuilt following WWII, the Europeans wanted to start getting out from under the American thumb. So in 1971 the French sent their Navy to US shores to demand the US give them gold in exchange for all the dollars they had. Other European countries heard about this and sent their ships out along with the French. So you had this entire European armada pulling up to the US saying, "Give us our gold, now!" President Nixon ended the gold standard immediately after that, out of fear all the dollars would be turned back in and the US would have to hand out all its gold. But once the gold standard ended, the dollar started to free fall. The US economy stagflated, and was in bad condition. Until -- they tied the dollar to oil. That also makes clear to you what would ever happen should oil become untied from the dollar again)

As for what's next for the US... well, that's hard to say.

The electoral system is no longer functional. But neither is the US at the point where "those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable." The US is still wealthy enough that most people are not living in privation; nobody is starving; the people are soft. They'll go out and LARP at a BLM riot or march single-file into the Capitol building when the police hold the doors open but they're not going to form up battle ranks and seize territory.

Eventually if conditions get bad enough there, you may see people behave in more desperate, revolutionary ways. Unfortunately, intellectual thought is so far degraded that you won't get a new set of Founding Fathers. Instead you'd most likely end up with an ideologue tyrant. People want a strongman to come in and take control of the chaos and bring order to it, so that is what they'll get.

There's a possibility here, which is that the current elites are not omnipotent, but neither are they dumb, and clearly are aware of these historical trends. So they may seek to get out in front of this process and try to ensure that when it comes time for it, a strongman in their pocket ends up power. During the revolutions at the tail end of the Roman Republic, both the populists and the elites had competing strongman champions who took power in successive revolutions (Marius/Cinna for the people; Sulla for the elites; Julius Caesar for the people; Octavian, who ultimately established the new Roman Empire, for the elites).

On the other hand, that doesn't always go the elites' ways. Josef Stalin was an elite-chosen strongman who ultimately turned on the elite who chose him. Vladimir Putin was too (he imprisoned or exiled many of the oligarchs who'd been sucking Russia dry after the USSR collapsed... which was a big betrayal to these oligarchs, because they were the ones who brought him into power!). The US system long hated Cuba because Fidel Castro was a strongman that system put in place, who then turned right around and nationalized US holdings in Cuba and made Cuba independent.

So, you don't know exactly how it will go.

But if I had to make a prediction, right now, I would expect the US to continue as it currently is for at least a few more decades. It'll experience a gradual continued decline in quality of life (as has happened for decades already... as you note), before you have any real strongman attempts at establishing a monarchy. Things aren't bad enough in the US that people are ready to throw out the current system and follow a strong sole leader. The seeds are planted for it, though.

After that, who knows. Maybe you'll see the American Republic transform into an American Empire, the way Rome did. Rome had to go through several decades of pretty extreme public tumult and successive revolutions to get there, though.


@DarkKnight,

As far back as 2017/8, all my economist friends were predicting a massive recession sometime in 2020. I sold all my stocks in 2019 in anticipation of this (ultimately a mistake... but I didn't anticipate this whole bananas situation).

Zillow predicted a housing market collapse bigger than the 2008 collapse. It published data in late 2019 that showed this collapse in housing prices was underway. The same fundamental reasons were there... sub-prime mortgages being sold again, under a different name... overheated real estate market... etc.

All signs pointed to a big reckoning for Western economies in 2020. And at the same time Russia was squeezing the US in the Middle East. Donald Trump, the mortal enemy of this financial empire (they hated him even more than Russia or China), had declawed its Middle Eastern paws.

So no matter what, the West was poised to get its clocked cleaned economically in 2020.

When that happened, the already-restless peasants would've likely responded in a predictable way: fire and pitchforks aimed squarely at the elite.

But then -- COVID!

And everything has completely reversed.

Housing prices are through the roof. Stocks are through the roof. Everyone's getting rich -- except those poor sops dependent on paychecks.

Extreme measures 'necessitated' everyone being locked inside. Not one life could be lost for the economy. Sure, the economy had to suffer, massively, but it was for the greater good. It was wartime. And in wartime, people make sacrifices for neighbor and nation.

What you end up with is a controlled demolition of sections of the Western economies, that was likely to happen anyway. But, fortunately for those in power, rather than the Wall Street fat cats going broke and taxpayers having to bail them out again (which was what would've happened; this may well have collapsed the system), the Wall Street fat cats got richer. This time, rather than pay for bailouts, taxpayers simply got laid off from work and had their businesses closed.

The whole thing is a high wire act though. The Western system had no choice. If it didn't do what it's doing, it likely would've collapsed. Instead, it implodes part of the economy, transfers wealth from poorer to richer, and removes civil liberties to make resistance much harder, and it gets to stay stitched together a while longer.

But, meantime, yes, Russia's star is rising. China's star is rising. Other countries become increasingly more likely to peel out of the US orbit and defect to the Russian/Chinese orbit. If you're in the US orbit, you must implement all these weird "divide & conquer" social justice policies that are highly unpopular with the public, and you must allow the US all its economic privileges that don't serve your country so well.

This is why you see the US getting increasingly shrill about, say, stymying Nordstream 2 (German-Russian economic alliance), China's various Belt & Road initiatives, etc.

It's also why you see all these social media-coordinated (e.g., US-seeded/led) color revolutions all of a sudden in all these disparate countries. Either to put pressure on the main countries they're in the orbit of (the Belarus color revolution to pressure Russia; the Hong Kong color revolution to pressure China) or to flip insufficiently loyal states back to loyalty (Thailand, Myanmar, etc.).

Ultimately this sloppy, chaotic response, where Western governments must treat their subjects as prisoners, meanwhile saber rattling against the rest of the world and sparking color revolutions everywhere, is back-against-the-wall, sick/wounded old tiger behavior. And it is largely because of Donald Trump.

Hillary Clinton, in her presidential candidacy, made clear she was going to enforce a no-fly zone over Syria. No-fly zone = "we shoot down Russian planes" = "we are going to commit to regime change in Syria" = Iran is the only country left in the Middle East opposing US dollar hegemony, Russia is on its back heel, and the international banking empire is secure.

Trump got in and set to work deconstructing this stuff. It opened up a power vacuum for Russia to move in and push the US on the playing field. This is why the American system continually claimed Trump was "working for Russia." He wasn't actually, and if I had to guess probably didn't even understand the geopolitics he was messing around with. He just wanted to bring the troops home and end foreign entanglements. But the end result was the US financial empire took a big, potentially lethal hit, and allowed Russia to gain the momentum.

Meanwhile, at home, there has been a rising populist insurgency against the current regime. Both the populist left and the populist right feel like something is wrong and want to change the system. This is a fire burning right in the heart of the global financial empire. Trump took this smoldering camp fire and turned it into a raging forest fire.

Had Trump been defeated in 2016, the way Sanders was earlier that year, domestic populism would've been swept back under the rug for a time (to need to be dealt with later) and Russia would've been corralled. China, which doesn't like confrontation, would've seen all this and stuck to a softer tone.

Instead, the whole timeline got messed up, and the system is now in a flat-out panic.

This censorship stuff all started after the Trump win. They didn't do any of it before -- they didn't think they needed to. Broad, hurried, emotional censorship is always an admission you are losing the war for hearts and minds.

But the tl;dr is:

This international banking/financial empire was overconfident. It then lost full control over the US, its power center. This loss of control caused some big damage to its tight-but-delicate system of international control. The domestic response has been to lock down the people and elections inside the system to prevent further internal rebellion. Internationally, it has switched into overdrive trying to destabilize foreign powers, who can see this global financial empire has become weak and have become increasingly bold.

You can look at how the Russian and Chinese leaders/diplomats have spoken to and about the US government since the Biden regime took power. Putin called the US "Shere Khan" and its various helper countries "hyenas jumping around it" and threatened a "swift, asymmetric response" if Russia or its interests are attacked. Yang Jiechi, the Chinese Direct of Central Foreign Affairs Commission, told the US it is not in a position to talk down to China and had better watch its tone.

Neither China nor Russia have ever spoken to or about the US like this before. However, likewise, the US has never been nearly so belligerent and chaotic in its diplomacy as it is under this Biden regime.

But the US empire is locked into a path it has no way out of.

It must keep its people cowed, or else deal with full-on rebellion inside itself, which will collapse it.

It must keep its adversaries on their heels, or else deal with them biting off the organs of its financial empire, which, too, will collapse it.

It's really an unenviable position for any system to be in.

The only ways out at this point are probably either eventual collapse, or world war.

But who knows, maybe the elites still have some tricks up their sleeves.

Trump surprised them, but they got him out and regained control. I sure didn't see this COVID thing coming.

Chase

Read all your posts here and just want to say thanks for all the info! I wasn't so aware of:

- The petrodollar concept, the power that gives the US, and how that drives what happens in the Middle East and elsewhere (I knew something was up, but the idea that the US simply needed oil also seemed a bit superficial).

- The predictions of severe economic troubles in 2020 (concidental to covid?).

- The real implications and effects of Trump's presidency from the opposition's viewpoint. I could sense that he was wrecking something critical, because of the change in tone from China and Russia and the stirring of various nations, but it wasn't entirely clear what it was.

I gotta say, it's awfully coincidental that covid comes along right before a financial collapse is predicted. Mainstream conspiracy theories aside, do you think there's foul play there at all? I've looked into it a bit but most of the stuff I found is basically tinfoil propaganda.

From my extremely limited knowledge of viruses and how they operate, it's understandable to imagine that it's a natural consequence of adaptation to modern times, a perfect storm that arrives at the perfect moment (i.e. the balance between contagiousness and lethality is a natural consequence of the current population density and ease of transport around the globe).

But given that 2020 was a convergence of multiple problems for the US elite (Trump wrecking the global power structure and the imminent arrival of economic problems) it could not have come at a better time for them. Besides WW3, I can't think of anything else that would enable effectively total cooperation from the population during a necessitated severe economic downturn, to the point of accepting extended periods of 'house arrest'.

This could be just one of those things that are hard to say one way or the other through lack of clear evidence, but I was wondering if you had anything to say on it.
 

Souverain

Rookie
Rookie
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
2
Will_V's thoughts mirror my own; look forward to Chase's response. Also makes me think: if not for COVID -- from a normie viewpoint -- would Trump have been re-elected? Also from what I've seen, the loudest conspiracy theorists are certain that China released the virus to destroy western economies... not sure how the US and China could find common ground here...
 

Train

Tool-Bearing Hominid
Tool-Bearing Hominid
Joined
Feb 3, 2020
Messages
230
That breakdown of the US empire makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the writeup on it! It's a good reminder to note events not from my personal point of view but instead a bird's eye. It's also interesting seeing these countries as their own conscious entities instead of staying hyper-focused on select elite/politicians/etc. Like looking at the whole organism versus its composition (ex. "cells"). It makes things click for why certain things happened that are bewildering at the ground level.
 

Ambiance

Cro-Magnon Man
Cro-Magnon Man
Joined
Oct 8, 2015
Messages
387
Wow. Thanks to Chase's three part explanation, I now understand the world order like never before. So many gaps have been filled, so much that previously didn't make sense now does, like why the Middle East was so damn important, or why Nixon went off the gold standard, or why the media's narrative is the way it is. There IS reason to the madness, just not much wisdom.
 

Chase

Chieftan
Staff member
tribal-elder
Joined
Oct 9, 2012
Messages
3,990
Haha, what are you guys trying to do... get us banned? :D

Not sure if you fellas have followed what happens to people/sites that question the core narratives around COVID. It's nothing good...

We can't touch COVID origins. Now, I will note, as was noted by Reuters, that the virus was identified in Italy 3 months before it was in China. Careful with the embedded assumptions on that article though... Reuters claims "it must have gotten out of China a lot earlier than expected!"... despite earliest identification being in Italy...

Keep in mind China (along with Russia) is one of the biggest competitors to the US empire. The US has a lot of reasons to want its public to loathe both Russia and China. You will note the US normie left loathes Russia, and the US normie right loathes China, for reasons they largely cannot explain (aside from quoting largely unsubstantiated left/right MSM propaganda).

Due to the Thucydides trap, where the declining empire goes to war with the rising empire, the US would be predicted to slough toward war with China. So the US in general is going to want to whip up as much anti-China public sentiment as it can, to support belligerent diplomacy and a possible major war. What's difficult here is the world is tripolar, and the US has abandoned Henry Kissinger's triangular diplomacy. The reason for that seems to be that when the current post-USSR geopolitical strategy formed, Russia was a failed state drowning in robber baron oligarchs, and China was a mere manufacturing base for the US. Once things started changing, the US found itself engaged in a string of reactions, instead of careful strategic planning. First reacting to Russia throwing off its yoke under Vladimir Putin. Then reacting to China failing to get in line under Xi Jinping. The US should be courting one of these countries as an ally to triangulate against the third. Instead it has lashed out at everyone and positioned itself as the one being triangulated against. That leaves it in the unenviable position of being a declining superpower rattling its saber against two rising superpowers at once.

Aside from that, and back on the topic of COVID origins... well. The top alternative political analysis website online was deindexed from Google and banned from having its links shared on social media after publishing an exhaustive piece on the various claimed origin stories and each one's supporting evidence. So that's a subject I will not dare comment on. We're not a political site, and that's not a hill I'd care for us to die on.

One thing I think I can say though is that aside from COVID origins/etc., which we can't discuss, the MSM does these virus/apocalypse scares every year. Africanized honey bees in 1997 and Y2K in 1999 were two I remember from pre-2000. But then once we hit 2000 it became "deadly virus!" every year. Bird flu, swine flu, SARS, H1N1, H5N1, MERS, ebola. Every year, there is a new dread disease the media is terrified will become a pandemic. The public goes along with it and gets equally terrified. Every year I have to listen to people telling me with shrill confidence that this latest virus (whichever one it is) is the one that will bring us down.

So the groundwork for this is laid down every year. All they need to do to get it going is activate it.

Other than that, I must beg off any discussion of The Sacred Virus.

The 2020 presidential election I would also prefer not to touch.

Chase
 

Starboy

Space Monkey
space monkey
Joined
Apr 2, 2018
Messages
200
Haha, what are you guys trying to do... get us banned? :D
Not sure if you fellas have followed what happens to people/sites that question the core narratives around COVID. It's nothing good...
I think people see off topic thread and look at it as a invitation to talk about literally anything. Still should be somewhat relateable to social dynamics,pickup,psychology etc
 

Will_V

Space Monkey
space monkey
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
193
Haha, what are you guys trying to do... get us banned? :D

Not sure if you fellas have followed what happens to people/sites that question the core narratives around COVID. It's nothing good...

We can't touch COVID origins. Now, I will note, as was noted by Reuters, that the virus was identified in Italy 3 months before it was in China. Careful with the embedded assumptions on that article though... Reuters claims "it must have gotten out of China a lot earlier than expected!"... despite earliest identification being in Italy...

Keep in mind China (along with Russia) is one of the biggest competitors to the US empire. The US has a lot of reasons to want its public to loathe both Russia and China. You will note the US normie left loathes Russia, and the US normie right loathes China, for reasons they largely cannot explain (aside from quoting largely unsubstantiated left/right MSM propaganda).

Due to the Thucydides trap, where the declining empire goes to war with the rising empire, the US would be predicted to slough toward war with China. So the US in general is going to want to whip up as much anti-China public sentiment as it can, to support belligerent diplomacy and a possible major war. What's difficult here is the world is tripolar, and the US has abandoned Henry Kissinger's triangular diplomacy. The reason for that seems to be that when the current post-USSR geopolitical strategy formed, Russia was a failed state drowning in robber baron oligarchs, and China was a mere manufacturing base for the US. Once things started changing, the US found itself engaged in a string of reactions, instead of careful strategic planning. First reacting to Russia throwing off its yoke under Vladimir Putin. Then reacting to China failing to get in line under Xi Jinping. The US should be courting one of these countries as an ally to triangulate against the third. Instead it has lashed out at everyone and positioned itself as the one being triangulated against. That leaves it in the unenviable position of being a declining superpower rattling its saber against two rising superpowers at once.

Aside from that, and back on the topic of COVID origins... well. The top alternative political analysis website online was deindexed from Google and banned from having its links shared on social media after publishing an exhaustive piece on the various claimed origin stories and each one's supporting evidence. So that's a subject I will not dare comment on. We're not a political site, and that's not a hill I'd care for us to die on.

One thing I think I can say though is that aside from COVID origins/etc., which we can't discuss, the MSM does these virus/apocalypse scares every year. Africanized honey bees in 1997 and Y2K in 1999 were two I remember from pre-2000. But then once we hit 2000 it became "deadly virus!" every year. Bird flu, swine flu, SARS, H1N1, H5N1, MERS, ebola. Every year, there is a new dread disease the media is terrified will become a pandemic. The public goes along with it and gets equally terrified. Every year I have to listen to people telling me with shrill confidence that this latest virus (whichever one it is) is the one that will bring us down.

So the groundwork for this is laid down every year. All they need to do to get it going is activate it.

Other than that, I must beg off any discussion of The Sacred Virus.

The 2020 presidential election I would also prefer not to touch.

Chase
Thanks for the response! I wasn't aware of how risky it was to even discuss it online, but I probably should have.

I think people see off topic thread and look at it as a invitation to talk about literally anything. Still should be somewhat relateable to social dynamics,pickup,psychology etc

Thing is that the control of sexual freedom is only the part of the overall problem that men tend to see first, since it directly opposes his core instincts and drives. Once you realize how much deeper it goes, it's hard not wonder how and why. That's why I like the fact that Chases articles and comments get down to the roots of things even if they have to go back thousands of years or cross multiple topics to do it.

Too few of these places exist where men can discuss the reality of things and how to build a life that isn't shackled by false truths and pseudo morality.

Of course, I'm happy not to talk about anything that is deemed too risky or unsuitable for the forum or subforum. These places are extremely valuable.
 

Souverain

Rookie
Rookie
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
2
That's fair haha, besides we all have to make the best out of the situation anyway. Can't change a whole lot right now.

But thanks for info and the links so far. So much figure out!
 
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